O'Rourke Library

Summer Reading 2019

Fenwick Reading Program

Community One Read (Everyone!)

One Read Announcement

A Thousand Beginnings and Endings

an anthology

Ellen Oh, Editor.

Star-crossed lovers, meddling immortals, feigned identities, battles of wits, and dire warnings: these are the stuff of fairy tale, myth, and folklore that have drawn us in for centuries.

A thousand Beginnings and Endings, edited by Ellen Oh, is the One Read @ Fenwick for summer 2019 because it is a wonderfully imaginative book that is very different from what we’ve done in previous years. An anthology of short stories based on traditional themes of myth and legend, the book is well suited to the goals of the Fenwick One Read Program.

The book is a light, fun summer read written to satisfy the tastes and interests of young adult readers. The design of the book offers a motivating option for reluctant readers that will get them pouring over the 15 tales to find the 3 they want to read and provides an opportunity for them to go further in their reading than they thought they might. For our more lover's of fiction and more advanced readers, this book is well written and feeds off of classic tales that are re-imagined to provide insights into the work of contemporary writers.

Although the themes are universal, the authors and tales are from East Asian and South Asian cultures, providing an interesting exposure to perspectives beyond traditional western works. The stories can be read, like most literary tales on different levels. For example, in the short story titled Forbidden Fruit, based on a Filipino folktale about an island mountain, the mountain says, “He was no longer a thing at all.” about a human being who has come to know her and she him.

The book lends itself to the imagination and creativity needed for the associated student projects. All students will be asked to write a short reflection piece on why they chose the stories they did, what they noticed about how they approached the book to make the selections and what they realized about their own reading habits and relationship to authors in print. Freshmen will be asked to write a letter to one of the authors who particularly moves them. Upperclassmen will be given the option of doing an alternative book project where they take an old hardcover book and design a cover for their favorite short stories (3) and artistically depict the characters, settings and tales inside the pages of the reworked book. The Altered Book Project also allows for creating three travel brochures to the setting of the stories they choose as long as the brochures also include characters and important plot points. The second option is to use the short stories in the book to spark a photography exhibit. The third option for upperclassmen will be to take a favorite folktale from the book and retell it in their own short story in the same way the Asian authors did in the book.

Fifteen bestselling and acclaimed authors reimagine the folklore and mythology of East and South Asia in short stories that are by turns enchanting, heartbreaking, romantic, and passionate.

Elsie Chapman, Chinese, Bullett, Butterfly 20 pgs.

Renée Ahdieh, Korean, Nothing into All 17 pgs.

Sona Charaipotra, Punjabi, Still Star-Crossed 16 pgs.

Preeti Chhibber, Gujarati, Girls Who Twirl and Other Dangers 28 pgs.

Roshani Chokshi, Filipino, Forbidden Fruit 14 pgs.

Aliette de Bodard, Vietnamese, The Counting of Vermillion Beads 18 pgs.

Melissa de la Cruz, Filipino, Code of Honor 13 pgs.

Julie Kagawa, Japanese, Eyes like Candlelight 21 pgs.

Rahul Kanakia, South Asian, Spear Carrier 21 pgs.

Lori M. Lee, Hmong, Steel Skin 25 pgs.

E. C. Myers, Korean, The Land of the Morning Calm 30 pgs.

Cindy Pon, Chinese, The Crimson Cloak 19 pgs.

Aisha Saeed, South Asian, The Smile 14 pgs.

Shveta Thakrar, South Asian, Daughter of the Sun 22 pgs.

Alyssa Wong, Chinese, Olivia’s Table 26 pgs.

Completed projects attached to the reading reflection paragraph are due to Homeroom Teachers on the first day of school in September (09/04/19). Once assessed, the grades will be forwarded to the Religion department in time to be included with the first quarter scores for report cards.

Click here for the 2019 One Read General Information Sheet

Class of 2023

Every grade level reads the same Community One Read. For 2019 the book is A Thousand Beginnings and Endings edited by Ellen Oh.

ONE READ PROJECTS: There is a special creative reflection option for Freshmen Only titled " Letter to the Author." Freshmen are also allowed to do, instead of the Letter to the Author, one of four creative reflection projects related to the One Read.

Attached to the project, should be a reflection reading paragraph that addresses these three points:

  • 1.)Would you have preferred that we just tell you which stories to read or require you to read the entire book? In other words, was it fun exploring the possibilities of the anthology, was it a time-consuming burden or something in between? Why?
  • 2.)Reading non-fiction, that is fact based, informational material like textbooks and directions on how to do something is very different from reading fiction like the stories in A Thousand Beginnings and Endings that taps our creativity and often asks the reader to suspend disbelief in imaginative and fantastical ways. Did you enjoy the experience of reading these short stories or did it seem like work?
  • 3.)When you hear someone say, “I can’t wait to just relax into a good book.” What thoughts does it bring to mind?

Both the completed project and the reflection paragraph are due on the 1st full day of school in Sept. 2018 (09/04/19).

IMPORTANT: In addition to the One Read book, reflection paragraph and project, every grade level also has a reading assignment from the English Department. Students are either selecting from the English Department's Summer Reading List or doing a special Honors English Assignment.

Click here for the 2019 One Read Simple Summary Sheet

Summer Reading Lists, One Read Project Descriptions, Frequently Asked Question Sheets and the Project Grading Rubric are posted below:

Click here for a 2019 Letter to the parents of incoming freshmen

Click here for a 2019 Letter to the Author Project Description and Sample Letter to the Author.

Click here for a 2019 Letter to the Author Frequently Asked Question Sheet.

Click here for the 2019 One Read Project Grading Rubric

Click here for the 2019 English Department Summer Reading List for College Prep ENG I and CP A students

Click here for the 2019 English Department Summer Reading List for ENG I Honors

Freshmen (class of 2023) may elect to do, in place of the Letter to the Author, one of the other three One Read Projects:

Click here for the 2019 One Read Altered Book Project Description

Click here for the 2019 One Read Altered Book Project Frequently Asked Questions Sheet

Click here for the 2019 One Read Book to Life Photography Project Description Sheet

Click here for the 2019 One Read Book to Life Photography Project Frequently Asked Questions Sheet

Click here for the 2019 Short Story Creative Writing Project Description Sheet

Click here for the 2019 Short Story Creative Writing Project Frequently Asked Question Sheet


Class of 2022

Every grade level reads the same Community One Read. For 2019 the book is A Thousand Beginnings and Endings edited by Ellen Oh..

ONE READ PROJECTS: There are three different One Read Projects for upperclassmen. You only need to do one. This is a two part experience. Whichever project you choose, you need to write a reading reflection paragraph that describes your experience.

NOTE: Your One Read project is due (to your Homeroom Teacher) on the 1st full day of school in Sept. 2019 (09/04/19).

IMPORTANT: In addition to the One Read book reading reflection paragraph and project, every grade level also has a reading assignment from the English Department. Students are either selecting from the English Department's Summer Reading List or doing a special Honors English Assignment.

The English Department Summer Reading Lists, One Read Project Descriptions, Frequently Asked Question Sheets and the Project Grading Rubric are posted below:

Click here for the 2019 One Read Project Grading Rubric

Click here for the 2019 English Department Summer Reading List for College Prep ENG II students

Click here for the 2019 English Department Summer Reading List for ENG II Honors

Click here for the 2019 One Read Altered Book Project Description

Click here for the 2019 One Read Altered Book Project Frequently Asked Questions Sheet

Click here for the 2019 One Read Book to Life Photography Project

Click here for the 2019 One Read Book to Life Photography Project Frequently Asked Questions Sheet

Click here for the 2019 Short Story Creative Writing Project Description Sheet

Click here for the 2019 Short Story Creative Writing Project Frequently Asked Question Sheet

Class of 2021

Every grade level reads the same Community One Read. For 2019 the book is A Thousand Beginnings and Endings edited by Ellen Oh.

ONE READ PROJECTS: There are three different One Read Projects. You only need to do one.. Attached to each project, however, is a reading reflection paragraph that tells us something about what the experience was like for you.

NOTE: Your One Read project and the reading reflection paragraph are due (to your Homeroom Teacher) on the 1st full day of school in Sept. 2019 (09/04/18).

IMPORTANT: In addition to the One Read book, the reading reflection paragraph and project, every grade level also has a reading assignment from the English Department. Students are selecting from the English Department's Summer Reading List.

The English Department Summer Reading Lists, One Read Project Descriptions, Frequently Asked Question Sheets and the Project Grading Rubric are posted below:

Click here for the 2019 One Read Project Grading Rubric

Click here for the 2019 English Department Summer Reading List for College Prep ENG III students

Click here for the 2019 English Department Summer Reading List for ENG AP Language and Composition students

Click here for the 2019 English Department Summer Reading List for ENG III Honors

Click here for the 2019 One Read Altered Book Project Description

Click here for the 2019 One Read Altered Book Project Frequently Asked Questions Sheet

Click here for the 2019 One Read Book to Life Photography Project Description Sheet

Click here for the 2019 One Read Book to Life Photography Project Frequently Asked Questions Sheet

Click here for the 2019 Short Story Creative Writing Project Description Sheet

Click here for the 2019 Short Story Creative Writing Project Frequently Asked Question Sheet

Class of 2020

Every grade level reads the same Community One Read. For 2018 the book is A Thousand Beginnings and Endings
edited by Ellen Oh

ONE READ PROJECTS: There are three different One Read Projects. You only need to do one.. Keep in mind that everyone needs to write a reading reflection paragraph related to the One Read summer experience.

NOTE: Your One Read project is due (to your Homeroom Teacher) on the 1st full day of school in Sept. 2019 (09/04/19).

IMPORTANT: In addition to the One Read book, the reading reflection paragraph and project, every grade level also has a reading assignment from the English Department. Students select from the English Department's Summer Reading Lists

The English Department Summer Reading List, One Read Project Descriptions, Frequently Asked Question Sheets and the Project Grading Rubric are posted below:

Click here for the 2019 One Read Project Grading Rubric

Click here for the 2019 English Department Summer Reading List for College Prep ENG IV students.

Click here for the 2019 English Department Summer Reading List for ENG IV Honors students.

Click here for the 2019 English Department Summer Reading List for AP Literature and Composition

Click here for the 2019 One Read Altered Book Project Description

Click here for the 2019 One Read Altered Book Project Frequently Asked Questions Sheet

Click here for the 2019 One Read Book to Life Photography Project Description Sheet

Click here for the 2019 One Read Book to Life Photography Project Frequently Asked Questions Sheet

Click here for the 2019 Short Story Creative Writing Project Description Sheet

Click here for the 2018 Short Story Creative Writing Project Frequently Asked Question Sheet

Mission

The O'Rourke Library and Mission Statement

The mission of the library is to support the curriculum of Bishop Fenwick High School. The librarians make available print and non-print materials that meet the students’ diversified needs. The librarians also assist the students in developing independent skills in using the library for research and recreational reading.

The library is integrated into the school in the following ways:

  • Conducting classes focused on research and life long learning skills for students for efficient and responsible information use
  • Providing hands-on experience in the use of reference materials
  • Providing access to Summer Readings & Projects
  • Presenting booktalks to students to stimulate recreational reading
  • Providing pathfinders, bibliographies and lists of specialized materials
  • Home of the Fenwick Book Club
  • Providing computers, printers, and copiers for use of teachers and students.
HOURS (school academic year calendar)

Monday-Friday
7:00 am - 4:00 pm

Book Club

O'Rourke Library History

O'Rourke Library History

The Bishop Fenwick High School library is dedicated to the O’Rourke sisters, Sister Madeleine Louise and Sister Julienne, blood sisters and Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur. Sr. Madeleine was professed as a Sister of Notre Dame in 1920, and Sr. Julienne in 1938.

Sr. Madeleine Louise arrived at Bishop Fenwick in 1963 after thirty-six years in Japan teaching at a Notre Dame High School. Sr. Julienne joined her at Bishop Fenwick in 1967.

They worked together for 28 years and made the Bishop Fenwick Library one of the busiest rooms in the school. Both sisters retired from Fenwick in 1979 to the Notre Dame Long Term Care Center in Worcester, MA. Sr. Madeleine passed away in January of 1986 and Sr. Julienne in January of 2001.

News, Fun & Friends in the Library

Fenwick Library News & InfoBites

Don't miss what's going on in the O'Rourke Library and Information Center as we look forward to Spring.

There's more news in the boxes above. For example, looking for something to read over February vacation? Check out the "Read on Your Own " page of the O'Rourke Library web page. https://www.fenwick.org/academics/library

On the list of tools to help you find a book to read, fiction or non-fiction, digital, print, or audio, you'll find…

  • Teen Finding Book app
  • if you liked…then you'll like database
  • Book Lovers website
  • goodreads account set-up page
  • Recommendations from the Nat'l Scholars Assoc.
  • a College Bound reading list

…and so much more! Pick one and have some fun. A new book, if you pick the right one for you, is a new friend.

And speaking of making new friends, think about making time for the Fenwick Book Club. It meets one Wednesday a month. and this month the session happened just before

The Fenwick Book Club met right before vacation to talk about its most recent group read, "perks of a wall flower" by stephen chbosky The discussion was focused on this book, new to some members but a re-read for others.

Titles from things the members are reading in the classroom slipped into the conversation along with what they'll be reading over the vacation. The library displays and bulletin boards were used to stimulate possibilities. Read more about it by expanding the Fenwick Book Club box above this section.



In other news from the library...

Each year, the Fenwick library makes new resources available to teachers and students. Taking a few minutes to search through the databases to remain current with the content, tools and other features that continue to evolve from year to year is not as easy as it sounds.

One of the acknowledged features of information in this second decade of the 21st century is its exponential growth. A shortage of time and an excess of demands, anticipated and otherwise, makes it difficult to keep track of it all. The trick that helps us avoid becoming overwhelmed? Try chunking things into smaller bites, reviewing and taking in a little at a time.

The Fenwick library works year round to keep existing resources vital to the work faculty does with our students. Periodically the library announces new and changing items worthy of your time and attention. To make sure these great resources don't go unnoticed and to optimize their use among teachers and students, the library will post a small bite a couple of times a month to encourage your interest and stimulate your curiosity.

Below are a series of info bites designed to keep you informed about library activities and resources. For example, Infobite #1 focuses on videos and how the library works to keep them current, relevant to the curriculum and available from on campus and outside of school.


Bite # 1

517 new titles were added to our On Demand subscription over the past month.

View your newly added titles: Click here to view a full list of the new titles just added to your collection. WARNING...Only Fenwick students, faculty, staff and parents have access to our subscription databases. If you are among our active community members, send an email to Ms. Smith, Fenwick Library Director dms@fenwick.org for the login and pwd.

The backstory on our Classroom Video On Demand subscription database…

Using online content for academic purposes is different than when we're at home just playing around on the web for fun. Of course, as users of online content we need to be questioning and evaluating what we're looking at all the time. In the classroom, however, it becomes even more important because we will be using content in an arena where scholarship, judgment and integrity represent us in serious ways.

YouTube is a popular and visual representations of content can really enhance our academic work. That being said, students need to learn how to evaluate a content rich video from a reliable and credible source, cite correctly using a standardized format, take excerpts and select appropriate quotes. One way Fenwick provides exposure to quality videos and guides students in the use of transcripts and the evaluation process is to include vetted content in classroom and research options. Video On Demand is a subscription service available to Fenwick students after they login to the library portion of the school's website. Classroom Video On Demand is a streaming video website, dedicated to delivering high school video subject matter related to the curriculum, with material appropriate for basic through AP courses.

Reading on Your Own

Welcome readers & soon to be readers!

So, you like to read or you've decided it's time to make reading fun so it's easier to get your homework done.

It's great to have the input of experienced readers but the fact is that your time with a book is yours, no one else's. What we read and when we choose to read it, are deeply personal moments that contribute to making us who we are.

Here are a few things that can help you select the next book to read:

  • Teen Book Finder APP.-- It's FREE! There's an app for everything and that includes one created by YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Organization) Remember, it's only a tool. Like any of these things, we don't follow it blindly but it may get you thinking and looking in new directions. Here's a link to the YALSA Teen Book Finding App that explains how it works. Use the QR code to get the app or just follow the directions to download it to your iPod Touch, iPhone or Android phone.

  • The What Should I Read Next tool can be fun. There's more to the site than just recommending books but start by entering a book you like and the site will use its database of readers' favorite books to provide book recommendations and suggestions for what to read next.

  • Go where the Fenwick Book Club goes! Teen Reads is a website designed for teens who love to read.

    The Book Report Network has thoughtful book reviews, compelling features, in-depth author profiles and interviews, excerpts of the hottest new releases, contests and more every week.

  • Create a free account on Good Reads Sign up to receive recommendations based on your favorite genre (s) , track your reading and share your lists of favorites with friends. Sometimes what you've read in the past is not a good indicator of what you'll read in the future. Linking with other readers who have similar and sometimes dissimilar tastes can open new worlds.


Just looking for a quick suggestion for something to read now?

Take a look at The Best of the Best published and updated regularly by YALSA. This list includes the best new literature for teens, including award winners, audiobooks, fiction, non-fiction and graphic novels.

  • This might be ambitious for some but a good place to keep your eye on is the National Association of Scholars. Here are 130 books the NAS recommends for colleges and universities with common reading programs. The first list contains 95 books appropriate in level of difficulty and length for any college freshman. The second list contains 35 more ambitious choices. Do you ever wonder how books make the lists they're on? Take a look at the criteria used by NAS and make up your own list for how and why you choose a book.

  • It's not like we don't know where we're going. Take a look at what college kids are reading at 21 Books on College Reading Lists Across the US. Don''t stop here. Where are you thinking about going to college? Check out their website to see what they're reading.

Miscellaneous links for Book Lovers...


  • The College Board Recommended Reading List for College-Bound Students is always a good thing to keep in front of you. Here's a checklist of titles prepared and made available by Lake Holcolme School District in Wisconsin.

  • Banned and Challenged Books --Each year, the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom records hundreds of attempts by individuals and groups to have books removed from libraries shelves and from classrooms.

  • Great Graphic Novels for Teens 2018 Not everyone is a fan of comics, graphic novels and manga but here's a place to start if you're interested. There's a large audience among teens so you might be surprised at what you find.

  • You'll probably like this website for many different reasons. for now, a reason to check it out is to look over its list of FREE audio books Open Culture is a collection of digital, electronic books, music and films with a recommended reading list for high school students.

  • Take a look at the 100 Books on the Great American Read List These books were chosen through a survey of Americans conducted by PBS and represent the favorite books of viewers from across the country. This list of fiction titles consists of beloved world literature to contemporary bestsellers, the list contains a broad range of novels, authors, time periods, countries, genres and subject matter.

Parting Tips...

Reading is best when shared with others. Don't discount the importance of the reading skills you learn in the classroom, with a parent, and with a librarian. Studies show that reading is a learned ability with measurable skill development in the areas of decoding, comprehension and knowledge building.


After all this, you might be looking for recommendations from people instead of from machines? Here are a few ideas:

  • Stop by the Fenwick Library. Ms. Smith & Mr. Czarnecki

  • What's your favorite subject? Check in with your teacher. They always have ideas because they love the subject too.

  • Become a regular at your city or town Public Library.

  • Don't miss the obvious! Check in with your friends to hear what they're reading. You'll be surprised to find how many people are reading once you start showing an interest in books.



Fenwick Book Club

The Fenwick Book Club met this week for their regular monthly meeting. Refreshments included the usual brownies and water and, of course an array of Valentine's Day treats. With February Vacation in mind, the focused quickly turned from food to books.

The new Young Adult Reader's App and the other links on the Fenwick Library web page got the discussion going. The Library section of the Fenwick website called "Reading on your Own" (above on this page) and favorite links brought the group to the conclusion that there's nothing to worry about in terms of finding something to read during vacation.

The website was only one of many things that happen in the library related to the topic of reading.

For example, the most recent Fenwick Book Club read was " the perks of being a wall flower" by stephen chbosky Here's a short look at the themes of the book. It's one of those titles the book club selects because members want to talk about the ideas the book investigates.

About the book....

Members shared their ideas about this book, new to some members but a re-read for others. It's one of our "Read the Book, Watch the Movie" series.

Take a look at the trailer for the movie.

Then the discussion moved quickly to books they are reading in the classroom and books they know will be part of the end of the 3rd quarter and into the 4th.

Members also considered the library displays and bulletin boards were used to stimulate possibilities. Displays related to time off and Valentine's Day included one that focused on chocolate and another display titled, Reading is Good for the Heart with its own collection of titles ranging from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet to Vampire Kisses by Ellen Schreiber..

The library bulletin boards introduced a range of titles that otherwise might not have come up in conversation. Talk about the reasons for reading took over the discussion. Some are born readers, others try to cultivate the habit so homework reading will be easier and the list of reasons grew from there. Some members read for fun, understanding of the world, we're reading because it helps in the classroom and we're reading because it helps stretch our imaginations and creativity.

The board behind the book return bin in the hallway outside the library has a Black History Month focus. They talked about Martin Luther King but the discussion quickly turned to current events.

The other board will be in place longer. It is designed to promote reading as part of preparing to go to college. There's a list of titles from the Great American Read Program on PBS that overlaps but isn't limited to young adult titles. Particularly popular is the list put out by the College Board for college bound students. Students are eager to see the titles they'll have in common with their future friends.


The group stays connected between meetings by running into each other in the halls and outside of school using the Fenwick Book Club Group app on their phones to connect with each other. The group feature of the app makes communication easier, facilitates regular reminders about upcoming meetings, allows for circulating titles of books being read and other points of connection between members outside of the regular meeting times.

The next meeting of the Fenwick Book Club is March 13, 2019 immediately after school. Take a look at the complete schedule of the Fenwick Book Club and consider stopping by. New members are always welcome. See below for the next meeting of the Fenwick Book Club for this academic year..

  • 03/13/19 Fenwick Book Club 2:30 pm
  • 04/10/19 Fenwick Book Club 2:30 pm
  • 05/15/19 Fenwick Book Club 2:30 pm



Why Read?

Why Read?

Make reading part of your summer. Here's why...

  • Cultivating good reading habits puts us in charge of our own learning. Besides, with practice, reading becomes relaxing and fun. Imagine looking forward to the reading part of your assignments.
  • Research shows that we are not born to read. Decoding test is a learned skill. New technologies are pervasive, and lean heavily on the side of visuals instead of text. Reading habits must be deliberately formed to optimize the higher functioning of the human brain.
  • Have you heard about the "Summer Slide?" Learning or reading skill losses during the summer months are cumulative, creating a wider gap each year between more proficient and less proficient students. (scholastic.com
  • There is a difference between reading fiction for pleasure and reading for information, i.e. textbooks, manuals and scanning text for specific purposes. Reading for information makes efficient readers but unless we're also reading for pleasure we're missing the benefits derived from exercising imagination, fantasy and creativity.. Reading fiction across the genres develops abilities like empathy, compassion, critical thinking and problem solving skills.. As in most things, a healthy balance of fiction and non-fiction reading is usually a good idea.

The Summer Reading Program at Fenwick (details below) includes both a Community One Read and a list of books from the English Department. Questions a comments during summer months may be sent to Diane Smith @ the O'Rourke Library using email dms@fenwick.org

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“Without libraries what have we? We have no past and no future.” Ray Bradbury

Fenwick Yearbooks going back to our beginnings are available online here.

Fenwick Yearbooks