Utility Container

Mobile Menu Trigger (container)

Off Canvas Container (Do Not Edit)

Close Button

Site Info Container

Fenwick is a Catholic, college preparatory, co-educational secondary school accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. Fenwick is committed to offering opportunity for greater achievement, with the following academic objectives:

  • A challenging but flexible academic curriculum that fosters life-long skills of intellectual curiosity, critical thinking and independent judgment.
  • A focused, four-year Fenwick writing program that provides a strong foundation for mastery of the mechanics of clear writing across all disciplines.
  • A fine arts curriculum that awakens a sense of creativity, nurtures imagination, and develops technical skills.
  • A physical education program that develops physical skills, a sense of fair play and habits of good health.

Credits Required for Graduation

4 Religious Studies
4 English
4 Mathematics
3 Science
3 Social Studies
2 Foreign Language
1 Health & Wellness
1/2 Fine Arts
1/2 Basic Computer Applications
5 Electives

Course Levels
Advanced Placement
Honors
College Prep

Technology

The Technology curriculum ensures that students have an understanding of technology's role in society, and the skills necessary for active and responsible participation. All students are required to take a Computer Applications course so that they are proficient in using an integrated office suite, which they will use in other curriculum areas. They may elect to take advanced computer courses, which focus on advanced concepts and problem-solving skills.

Students may apply in an online course through The VHS Collaborative. Although these courses include all curriculum disciplines, students who take computer and software courses are monitored by the computer department.

BASIC COMP APPS

  • Uses Windows and Microsoft Office Professional
  • Teaches students the computer applications needed to successfully complete the various computer projects in their courses at Fenwick
  • Software includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Publisher

EC BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS

  • Provides future entrepreneurs tools needed to master the most important issues involved in starting and managing a successful new business venture
  • Topics include the foundations and challenges of small business management, marketing and financial considerations, forms of business ownership, sources of funds, global aspects of entrepreneurship, and building a business plan

Prerequisite: guidance counselor recommendation.

Virtual High School is a collaborative of high schools from around the world that contribute online courses to students from member schools. As a member, Fenwick students may apply to take an online course provided certain requirements are met:

  • The course meets the standards of Fenwick
  • The course is not offered at Fenwick
  • The student meets the prerequisites for the course

Course lists and descriptions may be obtained from the guidance office or online at www.thevhscollaborative.org.

Some of the more popular courses include AP Statistics, AP Environmental Science, Bioethics, Eastern & Western Thought, Investing in the Stock Market, Pre-veterinary Medicine, Entrepreneurship, Music Composition and Irish Literature. Although these courses are taken during the school day they are treated as "independent study" courses and therefore students must be approved before enrolling. Application forms are located in the guidance office and must be filled out with the standard course selection form.

Meets prerequisite of courses as specified by VHS and approved application form.

English

Fenwick’s English Department guides and encourages students in the study and practice of all aspects of the English language, helping students master skills in order to read critically and appreciatively, to communicate clearly both in writing and speaking and to use all research tools available, both traditional and technological.

Fenwick students grow as knowledgeable, reflective, creative and contributing members of society, knowing that the preservation of our democracy depends on an informed, thoughtful citizenry.

The Fenwick Writing Program

Fenwick’s liberal arts curriculum has been designed to provide students with greater opportunities for greater academic achievement. Our four-year writing program fortifies these efforts by providing a strong foundation in mastering the mechanics of clear writing across all disciplines.

Fenwick’s writing program:

  • Teaches students to think clearly and organize thoughts.
  • Teaches students a clear understanding of the mechanics of writing in order to communicate clearly.
  • Proactively provides writing opportunities, particularly in English and History.
  • Challenges all students to create well-organized papers with the increasing frequency in written assignments as high school progresses.
  • Prepares Fenwick students for greater achievement in college and the workplace.

ENGLISH I

  • Provides an integrated approach to the study of literature and composition.
  • Introduces major literary genres, with students learning to analyze and critique short stories, poems, drama and novels.
  • Fenwick’s writing program at this level:
  • Instruction on sentence structure, paragraph development, and proper use of mechanics.
  • Critical reports and research techniques required.
  • All students are required to write a research paper.
  • SAT vocabulary is an integral part of this course.

ENGLISH l

  • Follows same syllabus as English I
  • Fenwick writing program at this level:
  • Additional attention given to grammar, usage and writing skills.
  • All students are required to write a research paper.
  • SAT vocabulary is an integral part of this course.

ENGLISH I - H

  • Introduces students to the major literary genres: short story, poetry, drama, and the novel.
  • Studies range from classical to contemporary authors.
  • Students supplement classroom study with outside reading assignments.
  • Oral presentations and class discussion are an integral part of this course.
  • Fenwick Writing Program at this level:
  • Students complete a variety of reports including research techniques stressing correct grammatical structure and usage.
  • All students are required to write a research paper.
  • SAT vocabulary words will be reviewed.

ENGLISH II

  • Offers a survey of American literature from the Colonial Period to the 20th Century with an overview of the social, intellectual and philosophical developments in America.
  • Provides opportunities to enhance oral skills through class discussion and presentations.
  • Fenwick’s writing program at this level:
  • Stresses the rules of correct English usage and the principles of composition in critical papers.
  • All students are required to write a research paper.
  • SAT vocabulary is an integral part of this course.

ENGLISH II

  • Structured around the same syllabus as English II.
  • Fenwick’s writing program at this level:
  • More attention to writing and analysis skills.
  • All students required to write a research paper.
  • SAT vocabulary is an integral part of this course.

ENGLISH II - H

  • Students analyze and evaluate significant developments in the American experience as reflected in the literature from the 16th through the 20th centuries.
  • Students are expected to master oral discussion skills through class presentations.
  • Fenwick’s writing program at this level:
  • Focuses on literary analysis and research techniques.
  • All students are required to write a research paper
  • SAT vocabulary will be reviewed

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in English I and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors English I and department recommendation.

ENGLISH III

  • Offers a survey of British literature from the Anglo Saxon period to the 20th century with an overview of the cultural, social, political, intellectual, religious, economic, and scientific movements in Great Britain.
  • Fenwick’s writing program at this level:
  • Students write a variety of critical, expository and creative papers.
  • All students are required to write a research paper.

ENGLISH III - H

  • Students analyze and evaluate significant developments in the British experience as reflected in the literature of the 20th Century.
  • Students expected to master oral discussion skills through class presentations.
  • Outside reading is required.
  • Fenwick’s writing program at this level:
  • Stresses literary analysis and research techniques.
  • All students are required to write a research paper.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in English II and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors English II and department recommendation.

ENGLISH IV

  • Students will examine many of the great works of World Literature from the Greek period through the 21st century.
  • Focus will be on classical literature during the first semester and modern novels during the second semester
  • Fenwick’s writing program at this level:
  • The critical essay and the research paper are stressed.
  • All students are required to write a research paper.

ENGLISH IV - H

  • Includes many of the great works of World Literature from the Greek period through the 21st century.
  • Students become familiar with the cultural/historical background of each period and the influence of each upon the literature of the time.
  • The poetry, prose, and drama readings are extensive. Outside reading is required.
  • Fenwick’s writing program at this level:
  • The critical essay and the research paper are stressed.
  • All students are required to write a research paper.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in English III and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors English III and department recommendation.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION - AP

  • For students who wish to receive advanced credit and/or placement in college.
  • Content of the course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes.
  • Readings will include-but not be limited to-a variety of biographies, autobiographies, literary criticisms, essays, political writings and fiction.
  • Goals of an AP English Language and Composition course are diverse because the college composition course is one of the most varied in the curriculum.
  • Fenwick’s writing program at this level:
  • Students encouraged to place their emphasis on content, purpose, and audience to guide the organization of their writing.
  • Extensive summer reading, submission of an acceptable research paper, and completion of the AP Examination in English Language and Composition are requirements of this course.

Prerequisite: Must complete a required writing prompt and English II Honors with an A- or better and department recommendation.

ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION – AP

  • For students who wish to receive advanced credit and/or placement in college.
  • Includes representative works from the four genres of literature, concentrating on the American and English traditions.
  • Fenwick Writing Program at this level:
  • Writing assignments include critical literary analysis, essays in exposition and argumentation, creative projects, and research papers.
  • Extensive summer reading, submission of an acceptable research paper, and completion of the AP Examination are requirements of the course.

Pre-requisite: Must complete a required writing prompt and English III Honors with an A- or better and department recommendation.

MASS COMMUNICATIONS - print and broadcast media.

  • Develops journalistic skills.
  • The various components of mass media in today's society are discussed.
  • Study also includes creating news/information programs for television and radio and discussions of ethical responsibility in the media.
  • Fenwick’s writing program at this level:
  • Class projects include writing and presenting newspaper, magazine, television, movie, music and advertising pieces.

PUBLIC SPEAKING

  • Course provides an opportunity to develop skill and confidence speaking in front of groups.
  • Activities include brief communication exercises, debates, and presenting informative, persuasive, and explanatory speeches.
  • Students make repeated use of writing and research skills, and practice speaking from manuscripts, note cards and visual aids. Students also learn to make PowerPoint presentations.

WRITING/SAT/ACT PREP

  • SAT Prep course that covers the knowledge and strategies needed for all three sections of the SAT: Critical Reading (30% of the course), Mathematics (40%), and Writing (30%).
  • Includes general information about SAT structure, scoring, and skipping strategy.
  • Offers instruction on planning and executing essays within the 25-minute time limit.
  • Strategies and shortcuts for dealing with specific types of problems are introduced and reinforced.
  • Exercises will be designed to build vocabulary, read more efficiently and effectively, and use the process of elimination on difficult items.
  • Score goals will be guided by PSAT results, available in December.

Fine Arts

Fenwick’s Fine Arts department serves as a vehicle for creativity, a means of self-expression, and a deeper appreciation of the arts. The uniqueness and creativity of each student as well as their talent, self-esteem, technical skills, ability to think independently, and reach their full potential are encouraged.

The creative process and essentials skills are taught sequentially and through examples, demonstrations, and verbal and written commands. Students have ample time to practice these skills, and then engage in a series of tests, quizzes, presentations, performances and exhibitions that demonstrates their level of mastery and how well they follow specific requirements.

Technology plays a significant role in art making. In photography, studio art, and general art classes, computers and scanners are used to create printed images, audio-visual presentations and graphic communications. Students use digital cameras and professional design software in a new digital media lab to complete several major projects. Students also use the Internet to research and explore art history and other topics in the arts.

Fenwick’s music department provides a foundation for a lifelong appreciation and enjoyment of music. Every student gets the chance to experience music, regardless of ability level, and they actively use available digital technologies such as music writing and sequencing software, MIDI and keyboards. Students also use the Internet to research the history, and various forms of music.

Courses

GENERAL ART

  • A general art course that aids students in the knowledge and handling of various media, namely pencil, crayon, chalk, charcoal, watercolor, poster paints, collages, portraits, landscapes, and many other avenues of beginning art and art techniques.
  • Offers all students opportunities for contests and exhibits.

INTRODUCTION TO ART

  • An introduction to the basic principles of "making art."
  • Students explore several media including ink, collage, pencil, colored pencil and many others.
  • Offers opportunities to participate in an art show and display best works.

DRAW/PAINT

  • Prepares the foundation for the serious student in the field of art.
  • Demonstrates how learning to draw means making judgments about the visual qualities of forms and the spaces they occupy.
  • Various methods using traditional and invented tools, pencil, charcoal, watercolor, computers, and various other materials will be explored.
  • Computers are used for art history, and as an art tool.

Prerequisite: department recommendation.

SCULPTURE

  • Teaches the fundamentals of clay and its properties.
  • Students work through various methods of hand-built construction such as pinch, coil, and slab. Other materials such as papier-mâché, foam board and wire are explored from a three dimensional point of view.
  • Projects are representational, combined with the use of imagery.
  • Offers opportunities for a student’s best work to be displayed in a school-wide art show.

STUDIO ART

  • Integrates the use of concepts with technical skill. Using the premise that design is the arrangement of form and color, students learn the positioning of forms and shapes in relation to each other.
  • Students also learn how to organize line and mass and use these skills in drawing, painting, printmaking, architecture, photography, 3-D sculpture and multimedia.
  • Students use computers as a tool to complete assignments for some projects.
  • A strong emphasis will be placed on homework and improving drawing skills.

Prerequisite: drawing and painting and/or department recommendation.

PHOTOGRAPHY

  • Students learn how to use a digital camera and photograph a wide range of subjects.
  • Students also learn to scan prints and negatives and how to output quality prints.
  • Students learn how to use Photoshop and iPhoto software applications to enhance/complete their projects.
  • Projects typically include a publication design (book), advertising photos, a poster design, and numerous prints..
  • Students present their work in the art show at the end of the year.
  • Students are required to have a digital camera that captures at least 12 megapixels for the course. Students will have at least two weeks from the first day of class to acquire a camera.
  • Students should be prepared to purchase photo quality printer paper and other supplies throughout the year.

Prerequisite: department recommendation.

ADVANCE DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY H

  • Course covers the technical and creative challenges of the medium. Class projects include photographing news, action, still life, scenic, candid and location photos, plus printing and compositing.
  • Students gain new digital photography skills and have their work critiqued and improved. The course includes lessons in shooting video, digitizing video, and editing video to create finished presentations in iMovie.
  • Students should own or have access to a 12 megapixel digital camera.
  • Students expected to have a portfolio of work completed by the end of the course. Summer photography assignments are required for this course.

Prerequisite: photography and/or department approval.

ADVANCED ART H

  • Course offers a rigorous in-depth program of study for those choosing to major in the field of art or to study art in an intensive manner.
  • The first and part of the second semester of this program concentrates on portfolio requirements; part of the last semester will encourage personal artistic growth. The emphasis is on the combination of the visual and technical skills with a student's creativity.
  • All students taking this course must exhibit in the Fenwick art show with an exit portfolio.
  • Computers are used in this course for research.
  • Summer art assignments are required for this course.

Prerequisite: drawing/painting, studio art, and/or department recommendation.

CONCERT CHOIR H

  • The young men and women participating in this course form a specialized chorus and serve as Fenwick’s primary performing vocal group.
  • The music studied will be fairly difficult, and mostly in 4 and 5 part settings. Concepts of proper breath support, sight-reading, good tone production, and diction continue to be developed, with particular emphasis on blend and balance.
  • Private lessons are strongly encouraged to supplement classroom work.
  • Students are expected to work on the music outside of classroom time, and participate in several concerts and various music programs.
  • Extra rehearsals will be required on an as-needed basis.

There are special dress requirements for concert appearances.

JAZZ/CONCERT BAND – Maribeth, again, this sounds like there is a course before this one…

  • For intermediate and advanced instrument players, and serves as the primary instrumental performing group at Fenwick.
  • Music studies will vary in style and level of difficulty. Concepts covered include good tone production and intonation, good technical facility, principles of ensemble playing, blend and balance, and sight-reading.
  • Preparation for performance is a major component of the course.
  • Private lessons are strongly recommended to supplement classroom work.
  • Students are expected to work on the music outside of classroom time.
  • Beginning students must take private lessons in an after-school program.
  • Participation in concerts and various music programs and extra rehearsals are required on an as-needed basis.
  • There are special dress requirements for concert appearances.

Foreign Language

Fenwick’s Foreign Language Department enables students to communicate in the target language and to foster an interest and understanding of other cultures and peoples. Specifically, the department follows the National Standards of Foreign Language Learning referred to as the 5 C's: Communication, Culture, Connection, Comparison, and Community.

Students learn, practice and apply the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing according to their readiness. The Foreign Language department has been a pioneer in incorporating technology into our program of studies.

FRENCH LANGUAGE & CULTURE - AP

  • Opportunity for students to demonstrate proficiency, both orally and written, in the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive and presentational.
  • Authentic audio and written materials develop students' listening abilities and enhance vocabulary and reading ability.
  • oStudents will use a thematic approach to demonstrate comprehension of cultural perspectives and make comparisons between cultures and languages.
  • oRequired advanced placement examination in French language and culture.

Prerequisite: French III Honors and department recommendation.

FRENCH I

  • Develops the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • New knowledge of grammatical structures; oral and written communicative and cultural exercises with exposure to French culture.

FRENCH I - H

  • Develops the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • New knowledge of grammatical structures; oral and written communicative and cultural exercises with exposure to French culture.

FRENCH II

  • Builds on the four language skills previously mastered; listening and speaking skills will continue to be refined.
  • Special attention to the acquisition of writing skills through grammatical exercises, and reading skills through cultural selections.

Prerequisite: French I and department recommendation.

FRENCH II - H

  • Further development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • Students challenged to master and retain fundamental grammatical principles; increased emphasis on reading and writing skills, oral interaction through listening and speaking practice, and continued exposure to French culture.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in French I and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors French I and department recommendation.

FRENCH III

  • Reinforcement of language skills and proficiency using grammatical structures.
  • Attention to the acquisition of vocabulary through a variety of cultural selections.
  • Students continue to improve comprehension and retention, cultivate writing abilities.

Prerequisite: French II and department recommendation.

FRENCH III - H

  • Intensive development of the language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing; emphasis on advanced grammar and vocabulary.
  • Continued development of reading skills, refinement of writing skills, and literary and cultural exploration

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in French II and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors French II and department recommendation.

FRENCH IV

  • Reinforces and applies the language skills previously acquired, with an emphasis on a reading vocabulary and higher-level grammar.
  • Literary and cultural selections presented to enhance comprehension and promote proficiency in written composition.

Prerequisite: French III and department recommendation.

FRENCH IV - H

  • Intensive reinforcement of the language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing; students will maintain, strengthen and further the language skills already acquired.
  • Continued development of written skills with an emphasis on strengthening grammatical knowledge.
  • Focus on reading skills and enhanced appreciation of literature and culture through a variety of selections.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in French III and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors French III and department recommendation.

SPANISH I

  • Develops the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • New knowledge of grammatical structures; oral and written communicative and cultural exercises with exposure to Hispanic culture.

SPANISH I - H

  • Develops the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • New knowledge of grammatical structures; oral and written communicative and cultural exercises with exposure to Hispanic culture.

SPANISH II

  • Continues to build on and the four language skills previously mastered; listening and reading comprehension will be developed through exposure to Hispanic culture.
  • Special attention will be given to the acquisition of writing skills through grammatical exercises, and reading skills through cultural selections.

Prerequisite: Spanish I and department recommendation.

SPANISH II - H

  • Continues to develop and strengthen the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • Students challenged to master and retain fundamental grammatical principles; increased emphasis on reading and writing skills, oral interaction through listening and speaking practice, and continued exposure to Hispanic culture.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in Spanish I and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors Spanish I and department recommendation.

SPANISH III

  • Reinforcement of language skills and proficiency, using grammatical structures.
  • Attention to the acquisition of vocabulary through a variety of cultural selections.
  • Students will continue to improve comprehension and retention, cultivate writing abilities.

Prerequisite: Spanish II and department recommendation.

SPANISH III - H

  • Intensive development of the language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing; emphasis on challenging students with advanced grammar and vocabulary.
  • Continued development of reading skills, refinement of writing skills, and literary and cultural exploration.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in Spanish II and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors Spanish II and department recommendation.

SPANISH IV

  • Reinforcement and applying the language skills previously acquired, with an emphasis on a reading vocabulary and higher level grammar.
  • Literary and cultural selections presented to enhance comprehension and promote proficiency in written composition.

Prerequisite: Spanish III and department recommendation.

SPANISH IV - H

  • Intensive reinforcement of the language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing; students will maintain, strengthen and further the language skills already acquired.
  • Focus on reading skills and enhanced appreciation of literature and culture through a variety of selections.
  • Continued development of written skills with an emphasis on strengthening grammatical knowledge.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in Spanish III and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors Spanish III and department recommendation.

SPANISH LANG - AP

  • Offers an opportunity to demonstrate spoken and written proficiency in a variety of situations, employing the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentation modes of communication.
  • The course emphasizes an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives of the various cultures of the Spanish-speaking world; students will explore themes that enhance their vocabulary and promote their listening, speaking, reading, and writing abilities.
  • All students will be required to take the Advanced Placement examination in Spanish language and culture upon completion of the course.

Prerequisite: Spanish III Honors and department recommendation.

Mathematics

Fenwick’s Mathematics Department teaches mathematical structure, concepts, theory, and skills so that students develop the expertise necessary to use mathematics in our technological world and achieve at a level required to access higher education. The program emphasizes problem solving, communicating, reasoning, and making connections in cooperative, student-centered classrooms. Mathematical study skills are emphasized with the daily use of notebooks and a multi-representational approach to solving problems, including calculator-based and computer-based activities.

Business and technology courses are offered through the Mathematics Department. All students are required to take a basic computer applications course. The remaining courses in the department are electives designed to familiarize students with career choices and real life situations in business.

ALGEBRA I

  • Linear concepts and skills development, application of these skills
  • Analytical thinking in problem solving situations.
  • Major topics include: simplifying and evaluating algebraic expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing functions, solving systems of linear equations and inequalities, operations with polynomials, factoring and radical expressions.
  • A TI-83/84 calculator is required.

ALGEBRA I

  • Linear concepts and skills development, analytical thinking in problem solving situations.
  • Basic math skills will be reviewed throughout. Major topics include: operations with real numbers, simplifying and evaluating algebraic expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing functions, solving systems of linear equations, operations with polynomials and factoring
  • A scientific calculator is required.

ALGEBRA I - H

  • A comprehensive and challenging study of algebraic concepts; emphasis on fostering thinking and self-reliance.
  • Major topics include: solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing functions, solving systems of linear equations and inequalities, operations with polynomials, factoring polynomials, radical expressions, rational expressions and an introduction to quadratic function.
  • A TI-83/84 graphing calculator is required.

ALGEBRA II

  • Further exploration of linear algebra concepts; emphasis on quadratic and higher degree concepts.
  • Topics include: quadratic equations and inequalities, quadratic functions, polynomials and polynomial functions, rational equations and functions, radicals, rational exponents, and complex numbers.
  • A TI-83/84 or Plus graphing calculator is required for this course.

Prerequisite: One credit in Geometry and one credit in Algebra I-Accelerated with a C- or better or one credit in Algebra I-College Prep with an A and department approval.

ALGEBRA II

  • An in-depth review of the topics covered in Algebra I, and a concentrated approach to the skills and concepts of Algebra II.
  • Emphasis on the study of functions, rational expressions, radicals, quadratic equations, and problem solving.
  • A TI-83/84 graphing calculator is required for this course.

Prerequisite: Algebra I and department recommendation.

ALGEBRA II - H

  • A comprehensive foundation of pre-college algebra; algebra as a field of numbers, real and complex.
  • Development of comprehensive solutions to analytical problems for both practical and theoretical situations. Topics: quadratic equations and inequalities, quadratic functions, polynomial equations and functions, sequences and series, radicals and irrational numbers, and exponents.
  • A TI-83/84 graphing calculator is required for this course.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in Algebra I and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors Algebra I and department recommendation.

ADVANCED ALGEBRA & STATISTICS

  • Development of algebra skills and an introduction to statistics; SAT/ACT preparation; SAT/ACT preparation incorporated.
  • Major topics include: multiple representations of quadratic, exponential, and rational functions; operations with polynomials and radical expressions.
  • A TI-83/84 graphing calculator is required for this course.

Prerequisite: Algebra II and department recommendation.

CALCULUS - AP

  • Students to earn college credit and/or advanced placement in college calculus.
  • Topics include limits, derivatives and applications, indefinite and definite integrals and applications, slope fields, and Euler's Method.
  • A TI-83/84 graphing calculator is required for this course.
  • All students are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in Calculus.

Prerequisite: Precalculus and department recommendation.

CALCULUS - H

  • Prepares students for a college level calculus course.
  • Topics will include limits, derivatives and applications, indefinite integration, and an introduction to definite integration and applications.
  • A TI-83/84 graphing calculator is required.

Pre-requisite: Precalculus and department recommendation.

GEOMETRY

  • Designed to help the student's spatial visualization while building his/her knowledge of the relationships among geometric elements.
  • Topics include basics of geometry, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, polygons, congruency, similarity, right triangles, circle relationships, area, and volume.

Prerequisite: Algebra I and department recommendation.

GEOMETRY

  • Designed to help the student's spatial visualization while building his/her knowledge of the relationships among geometric elements.
  • Topics include basics of geometry, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, polygons, congruency, similarity, right triangles, circles relationships, area and volume.

Prerequisite: Algebra I and department recommendation.

GEOMETRY - H

  • A challenging and rigorous study of geometric concepts and principles.
  • Students explore varied techniques of geometric proof and logic.
  • Topics covered in depth include parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, polygons, congruency, similarity, right triangles, circle relationships, area, and volume.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in Algebra I and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors Algebra I and department recommendation.

PRECALCULUS

  • Designed to help students make the transition from algebra into college level mathematics.
  • Students will acquire a solid foundation in algebra and trigonometry; emphasis on developing problem solving skills.
  • Major topics include: multiple representations of linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, logistic, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.
  • A TI-83/84 graphing calculator is required for this course.

Pre-requisite: Algebra II and Department Recommendation.

PRECALCULUS - H

  • A strong foundation of precalculus concepts, techniques and applications, to prepare students for advanced work in college level mathematics.
  • Major topics include: multiple representations of polynomial, power, rational, exponential, logistic, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, plus sequences and limits of functions.
  • A TI-83/84 graphing calculator is required for this course.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in Algebra II and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors Algebra II and department recommendation.

Health and Wellness

The Health and Wellness department creates in each student an awareness of the importance the body and mind play in their development. Each student learns that a healthy individual is not only physically fit, but also socially and emotionally well rounded. Through physical activity each student gains self-confidence and realizes the benefit fitness plays in their maturation. Team sports create awareness of total health and its relationship to leading a healthy life.

Through a comprehensive health unit, all freshman and sophomore students learn how to handle breathing and cardiac emergencies that require immediate medical response, and are made aware of the behaviors and decisions that could lead to risk of injury or illness.

Courses

HEALTH AND WELLNESS

  • Teaches the importance of a healthy lifestyle and other major health issues, including eating disorders, AIDS, smoking, bullying and substance abuse.
  • All freshmen students receive a certificate of completion of CPR for Students at the end of the course.
  • Team concepts and individual skills will be covered in a variety of sports such as soccer, flag football, volleyball, basketball and softball.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS II

  • Builds trust, self-confidence and develops problem-solving methods. These skills are worked on through Project Adventure, new games and lifetime sports such as archery, tennis and golf.
  • The health instruction includes the refresher in American Red Cross "Adult CPR," as well as the topics of substance abuse, nutrition and overexposure to the sun. The health unit covers half of a semester (a quarter of the school year), and will be academic in nature.

Social Studies

Fenwick’s Social Studies department develops the student’s ability to analyze, comprehend, interpret and relate the materials as they apply to the global community. Courses teach students to think critically, to make informed decisions and to understand major world cultures.

EC INTRO TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE

  • A broad survey of the basic concepts of the American criminal justice system and how it affects society.
  • A cornerstone course providing the foundational knowledge majors will need to proceed to other courses within the criminal justice curriculum.
  • Appropriate for both criminal justice majors and non-majors.

Prerequisite: guidance counselor recommendation.

GOVERNMENT &WORLD ISSUES

  • This course offers the opportunity to study government at the federal, state and local levels.
  • Laws are studied in relation to capitalism, socialism, and communism, providing a greater understanding of world issues.
  • Basic textbooks, a news magazine and related readings supplement this program.

GOVERNMENT &WORLD ISSUES - H

  • An in-depth study of various types of government, including democracy, socialism, and communism.
  • Special emphasis given to the American federal government and its influence on everyday life.
  • Topics addressed include political parties, propaganda and foreign and economic policies.
  • Extensive supplementary readings and class discussions.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in US History II and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors US History II and department recommendation.

LAW STUDIES

  • Provides an understanding of practical law (criminal, civil, and individual rights) with applications for everyday life.
  • Case law analysis improves analytical skills and promotes critical thinking.
  • An analysis of case law improves students’ analytical skills and critical thinking.
  • Exposes students to the many vocational possibilities existing within the legal system.
  • Research paper and supplementary readings required.

PSYCHOLOGY - the study of human behavior

  • Topics include: personality, motivation, emotions, mental health, and social behavior.
  • Develops student awareness of psychology as the mechanics of everyday living.
  • Outside supplementary readings and projects.

PSYCHOLOGY - AP

No course description available at this time.

UNITED STATES HISTORY I

  • Surveys colonial times to the Civil War as an overview of the development and maturation of American society in the "New World."
  • Introduces concept of historical thinking and writing.
  • Stress on the interconnectedness of social, economic, and political history.
  • Students explore critical thinking skills of analysis, evaluation, and interpretation from the historian’s perspective with multiple supplemental readings and papers.

UNITED STATES HISTORY I - H

  • Surveys colonial times to the Civil War as an overview of the development and maturation of American society in the "New World."
  • Introduces concept of historical thinking and writing.
  • Stress on the interconnectedness of social, economic, and political history.
  • Students explore critical thinking skills of analysis, evaluation, and interpretation from the historian’s perspective with multiple supplemental readings and papers.

US HISTORY II - H

  • Analysis and evaluation of significant developments in American history.
  • Students expected to work towards a personal stance with respect to values and issues in contemporary America.
  • Participation required in a wide range of educational activities, including readings, discussions, and independent research papers.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in US History I and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors US History and department recommendation.

US HISTORY II

  • Designed to examine the political, social, economic and intellectual development of our nation from its European origins to a place of world leadership in this century.
  • Reflection on major decisions U.S. leaders have made in light of possible options available at that time; emphasis on major historical events of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.
  • Encouragement to develop an open-minded approach to the trends of history.
  • Multiple supplementary readings are required and all students must submit an acceptable research paper.

US HISTORY - AP

  • Advanced level course challenging the student to do college work.
  • Advanced Placement credit is recognized/accepted by many colleges, allowing students to move to more advanced courses at the college level.
  • Full-year course covering the entire span of American history; emphasis on political, social, and economic institutions of the United States.
  • Particular attention given to supplementary readings and the successful completion of a research paper.
  • Students are required to take the Advanced Placement test.

Prerequisite: US History I Honors with an A- or better and department recommendation.

US GOVERNMENT & POLITICS - AP

  • Advanced level course challenging students to complete the equivalent of an introductory college course.
  • Analytical perspective on government and general concepts of U.S. politics.
  • Familiarizes students with the institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics.
  • Lecture based; advanced writing skills necessary.
  • All students are required to take the advanced placement examination.

Prerequisite: US History II Honors with an A- or better and department recommendation.

WORLD HISTORY

  • Interactive approach to the study of Indian, Chinese and Japanese cultures and their impact on the global society.
  • Survey of Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries with emphasis on revolutions, socialism, communism, and capitalism.
  • Emphasis on organization and analytical skills.

Prerequisite: department recommendation.

WORLD HISTORY - H

  • Interactive approach to the study of Indian, Chinese and Japanese cultures and their impact on the global society.
  • Survey of Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries with emphasis on revolutions, socialism, communism, and capitalism.
  • Emphasis on organization and analytical skills.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in US History I and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors US History I and department recommendation.

WORLD HISTORY - AP

  • In-depth analysis of the major civilizations of Africa, the Americas, Asia and Europe.
  • Builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage.
  • Particular attention to supplementary readings and the successful completion of a research paper. Students are required to take the advanced placement test.

Prerequisite: US History I Honors with an A- or better and department recommendation.

Science

Fenwick’s Science department fosters critical and analytical thinking across the disciplines of life science, physical science and chemistry. Students learn how to make observations, ask questions, use concepts to guide scientific investigations, use technology to conduct investigations, understand the construction and revisions of scientific explanations and models using logic and evidence, recognize relationships among patterns, and recognize and analyze alternative explanations and models.

Students develop:

  • the ability to solve problems using the scientific method
  • the ability to interpret data from laboratory experimentation, charts, graphs and tables
  • good laboratory techniques, especially the handling and disposal of chemicals and organisms
  • knowledge of safety procedures and precautions, minor first aid practices, and how to use the laboratory equipment
  • the ability to measure, organize and communicate scientific information in written and oral forms
  • decision-making skills by analyzing scientific and technological problems

.

Courses

INTRO PHYSIOLOGY/CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES

  • A sophomore laboratory course designed to provide an understanding of physical and chemical principles.
  • Major topics include motion, speed, energy, simple machines, waves, atomic structure, chemical reactions and solutions.
  • Emphasis is placed on collecting, recording, graphing and analyzing scientific data in a well-written lab report.

Prerequisite: department recommendation.

ANATOMY/PHYSIOLOGY

  • A laboratory course teaching the structure and function of the human body and the general concepts behind the anatomy and physiology of these systems, along with the terminology necessary for understanding.
  • Provides a basis for students interested in such diverse fields or careers in nursing, physical therapy, art and physical education. Included will be lectures, labs, dissections and films.
  • A research project may be required.

Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry or completion of Introduction of Physical and Chemical Principles and department recommendation.

ANATOMY/PHYSIOLOGY H

  • A laboratory course providing a platform for those wishing to pursue a career in the health related fields such as medicine, nursing or physical therapy.
  • The main emphasis is the relationships between the structure and functions of life systems and the body's homeostasis. Current medical terminology, lectures, labs, dissections and films will be used to achieve this knowledge. In addition, diseases and disorders will be focused upon. Individual project(s) will also be assigned.

Prerequisite: A student must have a B or better in Chemistry and receive department recommendation.

BIOLOGY

  • Content of this laboratory course will include the development of basic biological principles such as cell life processes, cell theory, Mendelian genetics, evolution, classification and biodiversity.
  • Students develop an understanding and appreciation of the ways in which humans and all other living organisms interrelate with each other and the environment.

Lectures, laboratory activities and reports, presentations, written papers and various projects will serve as assessments to achieve the course objectives.

BIOLOGY

  • A laboratory course introducing topics that include life processes, the cell, biochemistry, genetics and biological diversity.
  • Lab activities and reports, lecture and projects are emphasized to explore these core biological concepts.
  • Lectures, laboratory activities and reports will serve as assessments to achieve course objectives.

BIOLOGY AP

  • A laboratory course designed for the student who wishes to receive advanced credit and/or placement in college, and stresses independent study and research as a means of acquiring scientific knowledge. Self-motivation and an intense interest in biology are necessary to be successful.
  • Excellent reading, writing and interpretative skills are required.
  • Laboratory work will include enzyme assay, chromatography, DNA fingerprinting, bacterial transformation, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, diffusion and osmosis and population studies.
  • An independent research project will be conducted at the end of the second semester.
  • Each student is required to take the Advanced Placement examination.
  • Independent reading is necessary during the summer prior to taking the course. A syllabus for the reading is provided.

Prerequisite: department recommendation.

BIOLOGY H

  • A laboratory course requiring the use of logic and critical thinking skills as an approach to problem solving.
  • Underlying molecular biological concepts are stressed as the student investigates topics such as cell structure and function, genetics, living systems and evolutionary theories.
  • Reading comprehension is an important component of the course.

Lectures, laboratory activities and reports, presentations, written papers, and various projects will serve as assessments in achieving course objectives.

CHEMISTRY I

  • A laboratory course involving the study of matter, its structure and properties and the changes it undergoes. Both qualitative and quantitative types of analyses are required.
  • Mathematical skills from Algebra I will be applied in problem solving.
  • Written lab reports are required following each laboratory experiment. Among the topics covered are measurement, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical nomenclature, chemical bonding, types of reactions, stoichiometry and the gas laws.
  • A scientific calculator is required.

Prerequisites: Biology and department recommendation.

CHEMISTRY I H

  • A laboratory course that is intensive and challenging with emphasis placed on the development of problem solving and laboratory skills.
  • Lectures, demonstrations, laboratory experiments and discussions will be used to stress the major concepts and principles of this course.
  • Mathematical skills from Algebra I will be applied in problem solving.
  • Written lab reports are required following each experiment.
  • Some of the topics to be covered include measurement and conversion, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical nomenclature, types of reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, gas laws, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base theory and reduction-oxidation reactions.
  • A scientific calculator is required.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in Biology and receive department recommendation. Honors-level students must have a B or better in Honors Biology and department recommendation.

CHEMISTRY AP

  • A laboratory course designed to be fast paced and rigorous; students are expected to be able to work independently at a high level of achievement and possess very good mathematical skills.
  • Assignments include graded problem sets, as well as laboratory reports and tests. Laboratory work includes gravimetric analysis, volumetric analysis and instrumental analysis using a spectrophotometer. This course includes a more in-depth treatment of first year topics with an emphasis on thermodynamics, rate, equilibrium, solubility equilibrium, acid-base theory and reduction-oxidation reactions.
  • Students use the Equation of State, the Clausius-Clapyron equation, the Arhenius equation, the Gibbs Free Energy equation and the Nernst equation as part of this course. Each student is required to take the Advanced Placement examination.
  • A scientific calculator is required.

Prerequisite: department recommendation.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

  • Surveys the ecological principles inherent in terrestrial, fresh water and marine ecosystems.
  • Major topics include the relationships of organisms to each other and to their environment, energy sources and conservation, land-use planning, air and water quality, waste management, protection of wilderness and endangered species, cost benefit analysis and environmental ethics.
  • Lectures, laboratory work, group projects and independent research are all components of this course.

PHYSICS I

  • A laboratory course covering kinematics, vectors, projectiles, dynamics, work and energy, momentum and other topics as time permits.
  • The topics are treated mathematically at the level of Algebra II, including trigonometry.
  • The laboratory component includes the use of CBL (computer-based lab) equipment and software. Laboratory reports, independent work and projects are expected from each student.
  • A graphing calculator is required.

Prerequisite: Chemistry and department recommendation.

PHYSICS I H

  • A laboratory course covering kinematics, vectors, projectiles, dynamics, work and energy, linear and angular momentum, torque, circular motion, universal gravitation and other topics as time permits.
  • The topics are treated mathematically at the level of algebra II, including trigonometry.
  • The laboratory component includes the use of CBL (computer-based lab) equipment and software. Laboratory reports, independent work, and projects are expected of each student.
  • A graphing calculator is required.

Prerequisite: A student must have an A- or better in Chemistry and receive department recommendation. Honors level students must have a B or better in Honors Chemistry and department recommendation.

Religion

Fenwick’s Religion department teaches scripture and the Catholic tradition, in hopes of nurturing a vital relationship with God in Jesus Christ. Courses in morality, social justice, and Christian vocations connect the life of faith with moral actions within both the immediate community of school and family, and the broader family of the world.

The Religion department is uniquely dedicated to carrying out the school’s philosophy of “Faith, Caring, and Service,” and to fulfilling the mission of the school:

  • To proclaim the Gospel so it can be integrated into students’ lives
  • To create an experience of community which will foster the virtues of care, respect, forgiveness, fidelity, and faith
  • To provide opportunities to learn and serve, thereby empowering students to reach out to their neighbor and the world through works of mercy

RELIGION STUDIES I

  • A full year survey course with a comprehensive overview of Catholic beliefs and practice.
  • Topics include faith, revelation, scripture, Trinity, church, tradition, sacraments, spirituality, and prayer.
  • Service projects will be required.

RELIGION STUDIES II

  • A full year survey course with an integration of specific themes central to the study of both the Hebrew Scriptures and the Christian Scriptures.
  • Themes explored include revelation, promise, compassion, faith, forgiveness, justice, service and trust.
  • Service projects will be required.

RELIGION STUDIES III - Catholic Morality

  • Moral decision-making in the light of Catholic Christian teaching.
  • Examines various aspects of conscience formation, and designed to help the student make intelligent, logical, and compassionate moral decisions reflecting their Catholic Christian education.
  • A service project will be required.

RELIGION STUDIES III - Social Justice -

  • Students examine the call to social justice, and look at a variety of contemporary areas of concern, including poverty, hunger, sexism, racism, ecology and peacemaking.
  • A creative and hopeful response to the call to justice is encouraged.
  • A service project will be required.

RELIGION STUDIES IV - Christian Life and Vocation

  • Explores marriage, the single life, and the consecrated/religious/ordained life within the Church and the community,
  • Communication, discernment and the importance of both are stressed. Through class presentations, readings, and class discussions, each student comes to envision his/her future with deepened awareness.

RELIGION ST IV - Facing History & Ourselves

  • Cultivates thoughtful, competent, and creative students who see themselves as active participants in creating a more just and compassionate society.
  • Using the Holocaust as an extended case study, students examine: identity and membership, society's influence on the individual, community and the common good, racism, prejudice, anti-Semitism, rights and responsibilities, reconciliation, the promotion of peace and participation in society.

Powered by Finalsite